Jean-Claude Juncker

Jean-Claude Juncker was one of the founding fathers of the euro, a pioneer of European unification, and Prime Minister of Luxembourg. After 18 years in office, he stepped down in December 2013, as the longest-serving head of government of any European Union state and one of the longest-serving democratically elected leaders in the world.

Widely renowned to be a highly skilful mediator within the European Union, Jean-Claude Juncker was President of the Eurogroup between 2005 and 2013 and President of the European Commission between 2014 and 2019.

Elected to Luxemburg’s Chamber of Deputies for the Christian Social People's Party in 1984, Jean-Claude Juncker was immediately promoted to Jacques Santer's cabinet as Minister for Work. He was Luxembourg's Minister for Finances from 1989 to 2009. Juncker was a key architect of the Maastricht Treaty, and was largely responsible for clauses on economic and monetary union. A highly skilled economist, he held the roles of Governor of the World Bank, and the IMF. He became Prime Minister in 1995, and served two six-month terms as President of the European Council, in 1997 and 2005.

In 2006, Jean-Claude Juncker was awarded the 'International Charlemagne Prize of Aachen for his contribution as an "engine and pioneer of European unification". At the ceremony, former German Chancellor Kohl, recognised him as an optimist who had never doubted the European cause. He has also won many other awards including "European of The Year" and "European Banker of the Year".

Nigel Farage

Nigel Farage is co-founder and long-serving leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP). He was the face of the successful campaign to take the UK out of the European Union in the 2016 Brexit referendum, positioning the referendum as the start of a global populist wave against the political establishment.

Farage has been a Member of the European Parliament for South East England since 1999 and co-chairs the Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy Group. He has been noted for his sometimes controversial speeches in the European Parliament and his strong criticism of the euro currency.

In September 2016, Farage stepped down as leader of UKIP after 15 years. Writing in The Spectator, the journalist Rod Liddle described Farage as ‘the most important British politician of the last decade and the most successful’. Farage has become the great “disruptor” of British and European politics and is widely consulted for his views on the changing nature of western politics. He was shortlisted for TIME Magazine’s 2016 Person of the Year, but was beaten by Donald Trump. He won the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Spectator’s 2016 Awards. He has formed a close personal relationship with President Trump having spoken at his election rally in Mississippi. He was ranked second in The Daily Telegraph’s Top 100 most influential right-wingers poll in 2013, behind Prime Minister David Cameron, he was also named “Briton of the Year” by The Times in 2014.

In 2010, Farage published a memoir, entitled Fighting Bull (Flying Free), outlining the founding of UKIP and his personal and political life. A second book, The Purple Revolution: The Year That Changed Everything, was released in 2015.

Fredrik Reinfeldt

Fredrik Reinfeldt has been active in Swedish and international politics for over 25 years. As Party leader and Swedish Prime Minister, Mr Reinfeldt reinvented the Moderate Party (centre-right) and formed a four-party alliance that won two successive elections. During his time as Prime Minister, Reinfeldt reformed the Swedish economy and labour market, making Sweden one of the most competitive countries in Europe.

More than 300 000 new jobs were created despite the financial crisis. The Swedish economy had higher rates and sounder public finances than many other European countries during his time in office. Sweden was also the only country in the EU that lowered it's national debt during the financial crisis.

Today Mr Reinfeldt holds international speeches on geopolitical situation, leadership and the need for job reforms in Europe.

Having been a member of the European Council for 8 years and its President for six months, he has an extensive international network. In February 2016 Mr Reinfeldt was elected as chair to the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI). The EITI is an international coalition of stakeholders working together to promote open and accountable management of natural resources.

In March 2016 Mr Reinfeldt was appointed as Senior Advisor to Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

Mr Reinfeldt hosted a TV interview series in 2016/2017 called “Toppmötet” (The Summit) with Condoleezza Rice, Tony Blair, Anders Fogh Rasmussen and Jens Stoltenberg.

Thom Brooks

Thom Brooks is an award-winning author, broadcaster, columnist and senior policy advisor to the Labour Party – and the UK’s only Professor of Law and Government. He has 900+ media appearances and frequently comments on national and international television, radio and in print media. Brooks’s work has been cited regularly in Parliamentary debates, he is quoted by the Electoral Commission in support of their recommended changes to the Brexit referendum ballot endorsed by Parliament, he is quoted by the Connecticut’s Supreme Court in Santiago II in support of its ruling that the death penalty is unconstitutional and now being considered in Steskal by the California Supreme Court, he is noted by RCUK as developing one of the top 100 big ideas in British universities and he received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Arizona State University in 2017.

Thom Brooks has supported public understanding of the UK’s immigration for two decades and regularly provides advice to migrants. As inaugural Dean of Durham Law School, Brooks is leading the most significant transformation in its 50-year history doubling the School and reaching its best position now ranked 40th in QS World Rankings 2017 and National Student Survey. These achievements were recognised in Parliament in Early Day Motion 875 in the House of Commons. Brooks has represented Durham University abroad standing in for the Vice-Chancellor and sits on several University-level committees overseeing issues like non-staff budgets, governance reform and workload. He lives in County Durham, UK.